ENRICH-AF

A randomised clinical trial investigating if people with atrial fibrillation (irregular heartbeat), who have had a brain haemorrhage actually benefit from starting anticoagulant drugs.

 

Condition(s)

  • Stroke due to brain haemorrhage

Project type

  • Clinical drug trial

About the project

ENRICH-AF stands for EdoxabaN for IntraCranial Haemorrhage survivors with Atrial Fibrillation.

Bleeding within the skull, also known as brain haemorrhage, affects 3 million people in the world each year.

One in five people who survive brain haemorrhage have an irregular heart rhythm called 'atrial fibrillation', which puts them at risk of stroke and other blood clots.

Blood-thinning medicines, known as 'anticoagulant' drugs, are used in everyday clinical practice to protect people with atrial fibrillation from developing blood clots. However, as these drugs also increase the risk of bleeding, it is not known whether they should be prescribed to people who have had a brain haemorrhage.

ENRICH-AF is a randomised clinical trial to produce reliable information about whether people with atrial fibrillation who have had a brain haemorrhage benefit from starting anticoagulant drugs.

More information

Population Health Research Institute

ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03950076

 

 

Photo by ?utm_source=unsplash&utm_medium=referral&utm_content=creditCopyText">Derek Finch on Unsplash

Publication(s)

Status

Recruiting now

Contact

Allan MacRaild, Edinburgh stroke research nurse
allan.macraild@nhslothian.scot.nhs.uk
0131 465 9536

Eligibility criteria

People with atrial fibrillation who have had a brain haemorrhage.

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